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Frescativägen 40

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Tisdag-söndag 10-18


  • Huvudmeny

Dietary habits in extant and extinct rodents; in extinct giant ground sloths; and in Tritylodontidae (extinct mammal-like reptiles)

Dental microwear pattern on the occlusal surface of one of the oldest sloth species, Octodontotherium grande, late Oligocene, Patagonia. Image: J.L. Green.

Dental microwear pattern on the occlusal surface of one of the oldest sloth species, Octodontotherium grande, late Oligocene, Patagonia. Image: J.L. Green.

Summary

Dental microwear analyzes microscopic scars on the occlusal surfaces of animal teeth (mainly mammals) in order to evaluate the dietary habits of the studied species. This method can be applied both to extant and extinct mammals and has been used with different techniques: scanning electron microscopy, stereomicroscopy, and confocal microscopy.

My research focuses on the feeding ecology of extinct muroid rodents and tritylodontids (target tissue tooth enamel) as well as giant ground sloths (target tissue orthodentine).

Project Participants at NRM

Daniela Kalthoff (Principal investigator)

External Project Participants

Ian Corfe, University of Helsinki, Finland

Jeremy L. Green, Kent State University at Tuscarawas, USA (giant ground sloths)

Lars van den Hoek Ostende, Naturalis, Leiden, The Netherlands

Florent Rivals, Institut Català de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolució Social, Tarragona, Spain

Ellen Schulz, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany

Julia Schultz, University of Chicago, USA

Gina M. Semprebon, Bay Path University, Longmeadow, USA